Login to view PhD Thesis

Enter your username and password here in order to log in on the website:


Forgot your password?

Competence in transthoracic echocardiography: Assessing technical and interpretation skills competence, and exploring the role of basic science knowledge

Dorte Guldbrand Nielsen

Summary

Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is the most frequently used imaging technique in cardiology, providing noninvasive visual and dynamic information about cardiac structures and function. Assur--‐ ance of competence in TTE is based on evaluation of motor skills and cognitive knowledge, and has traditionally relied on recom--‐ mendations for duration of training and a required minimum num--‐ ber of procedures performed and interpreted. However, recent research has shown that competence in echocardiography is unre--‐ lated to these threshold--‐based measures of TTE competence, and an objective structured assessment of TTE competence has now been recommended. This thesis, which is built on three original research papers, pre--‐ sents the development and validation of an objective structured assessment instrument for TTE technical as well as interpretation skills. The thesis also explores the characteristics of the knowledge bases --‐ defined as basic science knowledge, motor skills, and clini--‐ cal knowledge --‐ on which TTE competence is built. The first study (paper I) is a validity study of a TTE technical skills assessment instrument. The instrument comprises a global rating scale and a checklist to allow assessment of all levels from novice to expert, as well as to provide formative feedback and summative final assessment. Our findings support validity of the instrument. The second study is a validity study of a TTE interpretation skills assessment instrument (paper II). This instrument consists of a global rating scale to assess TTE image descriptions and a checklist that assesses knowledge of TTE interpretation. Results show that by combining the global rating scale and the checklist to assess TTE interpretation skills, we can gather appropriate validity evidence for the assessment instrument. Finally, we explore the correlation between TTE technical skills, TTE interpretation skills (paper III) and the knowledge base of basic science exemplified by physiology. For both TTE technical and interpretation skills we find that novice and expert echocardiog--‐ raphers show no correlation between physiology knowledge and TTE competence, even though experts demonstrate the largest physiology knowledge of all expert levels. However, intermediate echocardiographers show a moderate to strong correlation be--‐ tween physiology knowledge and TTE technical and interpretation skills, respectively. In conclusion, we find that it is possible to develop valid instru--‐ ments to objectively assess TTE technical skills and TTE interpreta--‐ tion skills in a structured way. We also find a shift in the knowledge bases of physiology and TTE technical, as well as interpretation skills from there being no bridge between basic science and clinical knowledge in the novice echocardiographer, to the development of strong bridges between the knowledge bases in the intermedi--‐ ate echocardiographer, and finally to an encapsulation of basic science in clinical knowledge in the expert echocardiographer.